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Parallel parenting plans help children and parents

| Nov 8, 2019 | Child Custody |

Some Sugar Land couples cannot easily envision a time when they can talk to each other after a divorce without it turning into an argument. This could make co-parenting nearly impossible since it requires a lot more contact between the parents than these couples can handle. Parallel parenting plans could provide the answer.

Parallel parenting significantly limits the contact divorced parents have with each other. In fact, this post-divorce parenting method makes it possible for parents to never speak to each other in person, which could be the best solution, especially for the children. Parents only communicate about the children and do so through some electronic method such as email, text or a smartphone app.

Parents agree to strictly adhere to the parenting time schedule. Any changes needed should be kept to a minimum and negotiated ahead of time, if possible. The schedule is ordinarily highly detailed and includes holidays, birthdays and other once a year occasions. This type of parenting plan also delineates the need for separate parent/teacher conferences and the attendance of school and extracurricular functions of the children.

The parenting plan also includes a list of general rules for the children’s daily activities that each parent will follow. Each parent is free to create his or her own routine, but certain house rules need to be included in order to provide the children with consistency from household to household. Perhaps one of the most important rules in parallel parenting is that neither parent should make negative comments about the other parent, especially in front of the children.

Sugar Land couples considering parallel parenting plans may request the court to help create them. This often requires the involvement of third parties such as counselors. Many parents who have through this process also tend to heavily rely on their attorneys to help them protect their rights as they seek a resolution to their child custody issues.