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Child custody tips for non-custodial parents

| Feb 11, 2021 | Child Custody |

Texas parents often worry about their children, especially if a life-changing event occurs that disrupts their normal routine, such as divorce. When a parent signs a child custody agreement, he or she has the kids’ best interests in mind. It can be challenging to be a non-custodial parent, however, and it is understandable that a parent fulfilling this role will want to make the best of his or her circumstances.

Keep in touch even on non-visit days

Filing for divorce does not mean that a parent is trying to abdicate his or her responsibilities as a mother or father. Maintaining a close bond with one’s children is a natural part of the parenting journey, but it can be difficult for a non-custodial parent to do. Taking advantage of advanced technology such as video chats, text messaging, and other digital or virtual correspondence helps kids stay in touch with a non-custodial parent and make it feel as though they are not far away.

Make child support payments on time

If a parent has been ordered to pay child support, he or she must adhere to the terms of the agreement. Unexpected developments may make it impossible to keep up with payments, such as an illness or loss of income. A parent may request child support modification but must continue to make payments on time, unless and until the court grants the modification request.

Be willing to work as a team with a co-parent

The less parental conflict children are exposed to after divorce, the better able to cope and move in life they might be. If a non-custodial parent disagrees about a visitation issue or discipline or some other matter, it is important to try to stay calm and resolve the issue amicably. Sometimes, a legal issue might arise that a concerned parent does not feel equipped to handle alone. In such cases, he or she should not hesitate to reach out for additional support, especially if litigation is necessary.