The only thing certain about a Texas divorce is that no two cases are exactly the same. When a married couple has children, they must resolve numerous child custody issues to finalize their settlement. In some cases, the court determines that it would be best for the kids in question to live in a shared custody arrangement with both parents.

If one parent accuses the other of substance abuse or domestic violence, the court will consider the evidence submitted to support the accusation. If it is credible, it is less likely that the judge overseeing the case would rule in favor of shared custody. In such situations, the court might order supervised visitation only for the parent with alcohol or drug abuse problems, or may bar visitation altogether, either temporarily or permanently.

If there are no issues that would place children at risk, the court would likely approve a joint custody agreement. This is typically the best means for helping children cope with divorce. Both parents must agree to work as a team and to try to avoid confrontation in order to peacefully co-parent with one another.

Texas co-parents who have shared custody can minimize stress by keeping clear lines of communication open at all times. They will also avoid speaking negatively about each other, especially within hearing distance of their children. If a particular child custody issue is preventing parents from achieving a settlement or has arisen after a divorce was finalized, a concerned parent may seek additional support by requesting a meeting with an experienced family law attorney.