CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

PLEASE NOTE
To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19 ,we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person ,via telephone or through video conferencing.
Please call to discuss your options.

EXPERIENCE YOU NEED.
RESULTS YOU WANT.

The divorce process isn’t over until the decree is signed

| Dec 4, 2019 | High Asset Divorce |

It would be safe to say that most Sugar Land residents who are ending their marriages want the process to be over as quickly as possible. However, moving too fast could mean missing something important, which could mean having to go back to court later or failing to obtain the best deal possible. For this reason, it is essential to review the divorce settlement before the judge signs the decree and puts an end to the process.

Even a typographical error could spell disaster for a Sugar Land resident. For instance, a misplaced decimal point could mean less money than agreed upon during negotiations or than ordered by the court. The way something is worded makes a difference as well. Ambiguous terms such as “reasonable” could send the parties back to court since each party may have a different idea of what that word means. The parties need to review their settlement agreement and decree carefully and thoroughly.

If the parties are dividing a retirement account, the wording in any applicable qualified domestic relations order matters. In fact, certain wording throughout the settlement and decree is necessary in order to clearly define what will happen regarding a particular asset or situation. Failing to ensure that the wording is correct in the document could jeopardize a person’s financial security in the future.

If problems crop up subsequently, it would be wise to sit down and review the divorce paperwork with one’s attorney. He or she will know what language to look for, the types of errors that often occur, along with what it will take to fix any mistakes found. In some cases, it may be necessary to return to the negotiating table or the courtroom. Having a legal advocate often makes the correction process go more smoothly. Of course, having legal representation from the beginning could help avoid the need to return to court in the first place.